Florida Child Custody Laws

Qualified Jacksonville Custody Attorney

Wondering what laws govern child custody in Florida? Family laws, especially those involving child custody, can be very sensitive and complex. For this reason, it is encourage that you retain the counsel of a seasoned and knowledgeable child custody attorney. As a Board Certified Jacksonville divorce lawyer, I am fully prepared to provide the insight and support you need. I am also well-equipped to handle virtually any family law conflict.

If you would like to learn more about child custody and the related laws, be sure to call my firm. I am ready to put my nearly 25 years of legal experience to work for your family today! Request a free case evaluation from Charles E. Willmott, P.A. to get started.

Understanding the Laws

28 U.S. Code § 1738A was designed to give full faith credit to all child custody determinations made in state courts. These laws designate the age a child must be to remain under custody, what each type of custody entails, and much more.

When breaking down the laws surrounding child custody, the best tactic is to get a grasp of what the court is considering. They will be making their decision based on a wide range of factors, but their main focus will be to rule in the best interests of the child. But what exactly does that mean?

The court will look to give a child an environment where:

  • They have a stable home
  • They are not ripped from a rooted community if at all possible
  • They receive emotional, financial, and familial support
  • They can share equal time with both parents if possible
  • They are not in physical danger of any kind

Their health, safety and emotional and developmental state will all be considered. In regards to that, the court can decide what type of custody they would like to award. This can include both physical and legal, which can each be split up jointly or awarded as sole custody.

Where will a case take place?

The location of a child custody case will be determined under the Uniform Child Custody Jurisdiction and Enforcement Act (UCCJEA), which was drafted in 1997. It essentially provides jurisdiction for child custody cases, allowing them to utilize the correct court to handle the legal process.

Custody matters must be resolved in the same state where the child has been living for six consecutive months (prior to trial). If more than one court appears to have significant ties to the case, they will need to determine between themselves who will be handling the child custody decisions.

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The information on this website is for general information purposes only. Nothing on this site should be taken as legal advice for any individual case or situation. This information is not intended to create, and receipt or viewing does not constitute, an attorney-client relationship.