Injunctions for Protection in Jacksonville, FL

Taking Action Against Domestic Violence

Domestic violence has grown to be a prevalent problem in the United States. Statistics show that one in four women has experienced some act of domestic violence in her lifetime, while nearly three out of every four Americans personally know someone who has become the victim of either physical, emotional or sexual abuse. Unfortunately, this means that many marriages have ended for this very reason – it does not mean, however, that this is something that should be taken lightly. If you have been victimized by domestic violence at the hands of your spouse, it is imperative that you seek the necessary protection. With the help of a Jacksonville divorce lawyer from Charles E. Willmott, P.A., you can take steps to obtain an injunction for protection – which is also known as a restraining order.

Who can obtain a restraining order?

Unfortunately, a substantial number of victims throughout Florida are unsure of what steps they can take to protect themselves from future acts of domestic violence. My legal team is here to explain, however, that obtaining an injunction for protection is easier than you would think. It won't cost you anything to seek out a restraining order in the state – you must only be able to show that you have been caused harm by another member of your household. It is a common misconception that domestic violence only occurs between a husband and a wife, as this form of abuse can take place between any two members of a family, between roommates or even between ex-partners. In order to obtain an injunction for protection against any member of your household, you will need to show that at least one form of domestic abuse has taken place, including:

  • Assault / Aggravated Assault
  • Battery / Aggravated Battery
  • Sexual Assault / Sexual Battery
  • Stalking / Aggravated Stalking
  • Kidnapping / False Imprisonment

Filing a Petition in Jacksonville, Florida

If you are interested in obtaining an injunction for protection in Florida, it is highly recommended that you discuss your case with a Jacksonville divorce attorney at my firm. From there, I can assist you in filling out the necessary domestic violence petition and help you to prepare for the subsequent court appearance. Although this is not necessarily a complicated process, I would like to ensure that you are aware of the necessary guidelines and time limitations that exist. For a general overview of the process, however, review the steps below.

#1: Visit one of three county courthouses – You have the option to visit one of three county courthouses in Florida: the county that you live in, the country where the domestic violence occurred or the country where the abuser lives. Once there, you will need to ask the clerk to fill out an injunction for protection against domestic violence petition.

#2: Fill out an injunction for protection petition – When filling out the injunction for protection petition, you will need to provide the following information: your abuser's current address and phone number, a detailed description of the assault, copies of any applicable police reports and the dates and places of where you were married, divorced or separated.

#3: Appear before the judge on your scheduled court date – Once you have submitted your petition, you will be given a temporary restraining order that will last for 15 days. Within this time, you and your abuser will need to appear before a judge. There, you will explain the details of the abuse – after which, the judge will decide whether or not to order a full restraining order.

Are you and/or your children a victim of domestic violence? Take action today by contacting my Jacksonville divorce lawyers for the support and guidance you need to obtain the right protection!

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